Top Travel Apps Fail Privacy and Security Standards

Mobile travel apps are among the most popular apps to download for smartphone users – especially those apps that enable them to snag the lowest prices on travel or secure the best possible deals. However, the ease and convenience of using these travel apps to line up great deals and save money comes with a very big price for privacy and security. According to a study conducted by mobile security solutions provider Zimperium, 100% of iOS-based apps and 45% of Android-based apps failed to receive a passing grade for privacy. Moreover, 100% of iOS-based apps and 97% of Android-based apps failed to receive a passing grade for security. In short, just about any travel app you download from the Google Play or Apple Store is not going to meet basic security and privacy standards.

 

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Why You Should Create a Forward-Looking Privacy Policy

Data privacy, once primarily a concern for finance and healthcare, is rapidly becoming a priority for nearly all types of organizations, particularly those that collect personal information for marketing analysis.

Today’s collection of piecemeal and rapidly changing privacy mandates makes planning for future requirements much like aiming at a moving target. Yet a growing number of businesses are gradually coming to the realization that failing to anticipate the demands of future privacy legislation may leave them vulnerable to future lawsuits and significant financial losses.

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New Cyber Attack Trends Report Reveals That Digital Criminals Made Off With $45 Billion in 2018

A new report on cyber attack trends that combines information from a number of high-level sources has just been released, and it reveals a startling amount of cyber crime growth. The report revealed that cyber crime became a $45 billion industry in 2018, up tens of billions of dollars from the previous year.

The report from the Internet Society’s Online Trust Alliance (OTA) identifies trends by using data from sources including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Symantec, prominent cybercrime journal Cybersecurity Ventures, security consultant Risk Based Security, the Identity Theft Resource Center and the Internet Society’s own internal data to create as comprehensive a picture as possible of the annual cyber crime market.

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CCPA Update – Maybe Employees Are “Consumers” After All – Employee PI is Still In Play

If you have been tracking the proposed amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), you know that businesses and stakeholders have been clamoring to shape the new sweeping law in a number of ways. We reported earlier this year on some of the potential changes approved by the California Assembly Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee, which moved on for further consideration. Upon arrival at the Senate Judiciary Committee, several of these business-friendly changes met some resistance, including AB 25 which generally would have excluded employee personal information from being covered under the CCPA.

While employers had hoped AB 25 would amend the CCPA to exclude information gathered in the employment context outright, on July 9, 2019, the California Senate Judiciary Committee clarified that will not be the case.

As we previously noted, the Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee in April unanimously approved AB 25 which sought to modify the definition of “consumer” under the CCPA to exclude “a natural person whose personal information has been collected by a business in the course of a person acting as a job applicant to, an employee of, a contractor of, or an agent on behalf of, the business, to the extent the person’s personal information is collected and used solely within the context of the person’s role as a job applicant to, an employee of, a contractor of, or an agent on behalf of, the business.”

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Look Out for the ‘Look Back’—Begin CCPA Prep Now

By Tarah Powell-Chen – This past summer the California legislature passed, and later amended, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA). The CCPA grants California consumers an unprecedented amount of rights regarding their personal information (PI) and an expansion of consumer privacy expectations. Although the CCPA does not go into effect until Jan. 1, 2020, a key provision known as the “look back” requires California businesses covered by the CCPA to begin preparing now. This article provides a brief overview of the key provisions included in the CCPA, the “look back” provision, how to take action for compliance now and the potential penalties for violating the CCPA.

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As Facebook Raised a Privacy Wall, It Carved an Opening for Tech Giants – NYT

By Gabriel J.X. Dance, Michael LaForgia and Nicholas Confessore –

For years, Facebook gave some of the world’s largest technology companies more intrusive access to users’ personal data than it has disclosed, effectively exempting those business partners from its usual privacy rules, according to internal records and interviews.

The special arrangements are detailed in hundreds of pages of Facebook documents obtained by The New York Times. The records, generated in 2017 by the company’s internal system for tracking partnerships, provide the most complete picture yet of the social network’s data-sharing practices. They also underscore how personal data has become the most prized commodity of the digital age, traded on a vast scale by some of the most powerful companies in Silicon Valley and beyond.

 

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Europe’s sweeping privacy rule was supposed to change the internet, but so far it’s mostly created frustration for users, companies, and regulators – CNBC

By Kate Fazzini – The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation was celebrated as a revolution in how internet privacy could be legislated. It was a reaction to long-term concerns in the EU about information collection by tech giants like FacebookAlphabet and Apple.

Known as GDPR, the regulation gave sweeping new powers to individuals in how they can control their data, including the right to demand that companies tell them how their data is used, and to ask corporations to destroy their data, a tenet of the law known as “the right to be forgotten.”

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Facebook’s new plan doesn’t protect your privacy, and neither does the FTC – CNN

By Sally Hubbard for CNN Business Perspectives – The company made $56 billion in 2018, in part by tracking people both on and off its platform and then selling targeted advertisements based on that surveillance. Yet when Facebook announced a shift to a “privacy-focused communications platform” in March and unveiled a redesign toward private messaging at its F8 developers conference on Tuesday, Facebook’s stock value did not even dip. How could that be, if surveillance is essential to Facebook’s business model?

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